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Transplanting (HTW Tip)
Transplanting occurs when seedlings become too big for the container you have started them in. If you have started multiple seeds in one container, it is best to transplant them to their own individual containers when they have two sets of leaves. The first set of leaves you see from your seedling will actually be their cotyledons or their embryonic leaves. True leaves will begin forming as the second set of leaves. With tomatoes in particular, its true leaves will be serrated while its cotyledons are simple (not serrated). 
Transplant your individual plants to individual containers that are bigger. Make sure to create drainage holes once again and feed your newly transplanted seedlings with fertilizer. Also remember to label your plants as you go so you do not become confused as to what plant went where. We all think we know what plants are what until you become distracted and realize you have a bunch of seedlings and no idea which is which.

Transplanting (HTW Tip)

Transplanting occurs when seedlings become too big for the container you have started them in. If you have started multiple seeds in one container, it is best to transplant them to their own individual containers when they have two sets of leaves. The first set of leaves you see from your seedling will actually be their cotyledons or their embryonic leaves. True leaves will begin forming as the second set of leaves. With tomatoes in particular, its true leaves will be serrated while its cotyledons are simple (not serrated).

Transplant your individual plants to individual containers that are bigger. Make sure to create drainage holes once again and feed your newly transplanted seedlings with fertilizer. Also remember to label your plants as you go so you do not become confused as to what plant went where. We all think we know what plants are what until you become distracted and realize you have a bunch of seedlings and no idea which is which.

The afternoon we planted

Yesterday afternoon Cara, Sarah, and I planted our little veggie seedlings in the teaching garden. We ended up with 10 rows of veggies altogether. Some we directly sowed and did not start from seeds. These tend to do better when direct sowed (ds).

 

From left to right we planted in rows

1)      carrots & radish (ds)

2)      mesculin, white chard, & arugula (all ds)

3)      kale & red chard (ds)

4)      cabbage

5)      broccoli

6)      cauliflower

7)      beets

8)      (sickly, sad looking) lettuce

9)      N/A

10)   Onions

11)   Cucumbers

Things we learned

·       Plant half as many seedlings of cabbage, broccoli, cauliflower, and cucumber. We had about half a flat of each of these leftover. We’re keeping some on reserve in case some of our seedlings don’t make it. Otherwise, we will be donating them to our staff garden near our kitchen on our property.

·        Trying to start onions from seed is extremely difficult. We had to scrap all of our “seedling onions.” The onions we planted are the ones that were rescued from our garden earlier this spring (which were planted last fall).

·        Egg cartons are great for starting seeds but you can’t keep them in the carton for very long. We lost of all our cute little squash plants because we didn’t bump them up to a bigger pot fast enough. We will be directly sowing the rest of our squash seedlings next week in hopes of having some squash plants (for Cara and Sarah to eat).

·        Starting lettuce from seed also did not seem to go very well. I couldn’t give up on them so I planted them in one of our open/unused rows. I also seem to have misplaced the other lettuce seeds  I thought we had so if these little guys don’t take, I will have to go buy some more.

The big day… postponed

Due to the rain yesterday afternoon and night as well as today, we have decided to postpone the big day of transplanting. Our teaching garden soil has a pretty high clay content and therefore takes quite a while to dry out. Walking or working in soil that has such a high moisture content makes for a compact and hard to work soil base. So we’re hoping for a couple of days of drying time (which may or may not happen in Kentucky).

Instead of transplanting today, we are using it as another day for hardening off the seedlings. Tonight, we are hoping to leave them out. They have been covered under our patio for the last couple of days. I’m planning to expose them completely on Friday during the day as another measure to harden them off.

Cara did, however, create our rows needed to plant. We are now hoping to plant on May 1st. She diligently hoed away (while in overalls) to make us 10 neat plant rows.