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Here is today’s harvest of tomatoes. They have become a favorite in the office. Great alternative to doughnuts, cupcakes, cakes, and everything else pastry that seems to infiltrate our office at extraordinary rates these days.

Here is today’s harvest of tomatoes. They have become a favorite in the office. Great alternative to doughnuts, cupcakes, cakes, and everything else pastry that seems to infiltrate our office at extraordinary rates these days.

Our volunteer tomato plants have become a “tomato bush”. They are producing a bountiful harvest as Cara is showing here. We’ve had to scrap all the cold weather crops (broccoli, cauliflower, cabbage). We just didn’t get them in the ground fast enough. Oh well… lesson learned!

Our volunteer tomato plants have become a “tomato bush”. They are producing a bountiful harvest as Cara is showing here. We’ve had to scrap all the cold weather crops (broccoli, cauliflower, cabbage). We just didn’t get them in the ground fast enough. Oh well… lesson learned!

Today’s harvest included some interesting carrots (Danvers), baby tomatoes, and one small pepper that toppled over a pepper plant. Cara has renamed this variety of carrots “the voluptuous dancer” which seems much more defining than Danvers. Carrots with multiple taproots or forks like these occur for several reasons. Most likely they are associated with rocky or heavy soils. Digging and the addition of compost helps to alleviate this problem.

Today’s harvest included some interesting carrots (Danvers), baby tomatoes, and one small pepper that toppled over a pepper plant. Cara has renamed this variety of carrots “the voluptuous dancer” which seems much more defining than Danvers. Carrots with multiple taproots or forks like these occur for several reasons. Most likely they are associated with rocky or heavy soils. Digging and the addition of compost helps to alleviate this problem.

After the great weeding last week conducted by new pathways, we’ve found quite a jungle of volunteer tomato plants. We’ve of course embraced these plants wholeheartedly. We’re quite excited to see this many come back from last season on their own.

After the great weeding last week conducted by new pathways, we’ve found quite a jungle of volunteer tomato plants. We’ve of course embraced these plants wholeheartedly. We’re quite excited to see this many come back from last season on their own.

Here is our teaching garden to-date. You can see near the right side of the photo the newly planted rows of sweet and spicy peppers. It’s a full veggie garden now!

Here is our teaching garden to-date. You can see near the right side of the photo the newly planted rows of sweet and spicy peppers. It’s a full veggie garden now!

We had a great group out on 6/13. Here they are with a couple of LACBG staff in the teaching garden completing a portion of their service project with us. Here they are weeding out the area that our tomatoes will be transplanted. They weeded the vegetable garden, herb garden, kentucky native garden, and turned all three compost piles. The amount of work they did saved us WEEKS and we are very grateful for their service.
During the great weeding, we also found about a dozen volunteer tomato plants already in the tomato area!

We had a great group out on 6/13. Here they are with a couple of LACBG staff in the teaching garden completing a portion of their service project with us. Here they are weeding out the area that our tomatoes will be transplanted. They weeded the vegetable garden, herb garden, kentucky native garden, and turned all three compost piles. The amount of work they did saved us WEEKS and we are very grateful for their service.

During the great weeding, we also found about a dozen volunteer tomato plants already in the tomato area!

We finally moved the last of our seedlings down to our teaching garden on Tuesday June 12. Here they are in their glory! Here are the sweet and hot peppers as well as our tomatoes.

We finally moved the last of our seedlings down to our teaching garden on Tuesday June 12. Here they are in their glory! Here are the sweet and hot peppers as well as our tomatoes.

Here is our vegetable garden to-date with hay and newspaper interspersed. The right side of this garden has been reserved for our peppers, which will go into the ground within the next week or so. The back portion is reserved for our tomatoes, which will also be joining the teaching garden soon!

Here is our vegetable garden to-date with hay and newspaper interspersed. The right side of this garden has been reserved for our peppers, which will go into the ground within the next week or so. The back portion is reserved for our tomatoes, which will also be joining the teaching garden soon!

Volunteer plants
In this gardening season, we’ve had several volunteer plants make their presence known in our teaching garden. The most common have been lettuce, squash, and tomatoes. Volunteer plants are called so because they volunteer to start growing without any planting or sowing by humans. Most likely these are seeds that survived from seasons past, didn’t decompose in the compost, or may have possibly been deposited by birds.
These have been really exciting to find while weeding our garden. Seems to make pulling all the weeds worthwhile when you find an actual plant. Even though our plants are in nice, neat rows, I’ve let the volunteers sprout wherever they please. This is one of our lettuce plants that sprouted from last year’s lettuce crop. Since our lettuce did so terrible this year, I figured it couldn’t hurt letting this one grow (even though it’s in our tomato area).
Another interesting volunteer plant appeared in our middle bin of our compost. A full tomato plant appeared. It has now been transplanted to the proper tomato area and out of harm’s way in the ever-turning compost pile.

Volunteer plants

In this gardening season, we’ve had several volunteer plants make their presence known in our teaching garden. The most common have been lettuce, squash, and tomatoes. Volunteer plants are called so because they volunteer to start growing without any planting or sowing by humans. Most likely these are seeds that survived from seasons past, didn’t decompose in the compost, or may have possibly been deposited by birds.

These have been really exciting to find while weeding our garden. Seems to make pulling all the weeds worthwhile when you find an actual plant. Even though our plants are in nice, neat rows, I’ve let the volunteers sprout wherever they please. This is one of our lettuce plants that sprouted from last year’s lettuce crop. Since our lettuce did so terrible this year, I figured it couldn’t hurt letting this one grow (even though it’s in our tomato area).

Another interesting volunteer plant appeared in our middle bin of our compost. A full tomato plant appeared. It has now been transplanted to the proper tomato area and out of harm’s way in the ever-turning compost pile.

Transplanting seedlings
Yesterday (5/8/2012) Sarah, Cara, Baker, Greyson, and I repotted the little tomato seedlings from seed starting in our egg cartons. We also repotted our sweet and hot peppers that have been growing since this little project started. They need a bit longer indoors and then we’ll start the process with hardening them off as well.

Transplanting seedlings

Yesterday (5/8/2012) Sarah, Cara, Baker, Greyson, and I repotted the little tomato seedlings from seed starting in our egg cartons. We also repotted our sweet and hot peppers that have been growing since this little project started. They need a bit longer indoors and then we’ll start the process with hardening them off as well.