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Today’s harvest included some interesting carrots (Danvers), baby tomatoes, and one small pepper that toppled over a pepper plant. Cara has renamed this variety of carrots “the voluptuous dancer” which seems much more defining than Danvers. Carrots with multiple taproots or forks like these occur for several reasons. Most likely they are associated with rocky or heavy soils. Digging and the addition of compost helps to alleviate this problem.

Today’s harvest included some interesting carrots (Danvers), baby tomatoes, and one small pepper that toppled over a pepper plant. Cara has renamed this variety of carrots “the voluptuous dancer” which seems much more defining than Danvers. Carrots with multiple taproots or forks like these occur for several reasons. Most likely they are associated with rocky or heavy soils. Digging and the addition of compost helps to alleviate this problem.

Here is our teaching garden to-date. You can see near the right side of the photo the newly planted rows of sweet and spicy peppers. It’s a full veggie garden now!

Here is our teaching garden to-date. You can see near the right side of the photo the newly planted rows of sweet and spicy peppers. It’s a full veggie garden now!

Cara and I planted the peppers today. They’ve fit nicely into the two extra rows we created. They’ve also replaced the last of the beets that we’ve pulled from the garden.
We planted both the sweet peppers and the spicy peppers interspersed with one another. We thought it would add to the excitement of pepper picking when that season comes.

Cara and I planted the peppers today. They’ve fit nicely into the two extra rows we created. They’ve also replaced the last of the beets that we’ve pulled from the garden.

We planted both the sweet peppers and the spicy peppers interspersed with one another. We thought it would add to the excitement of pepper picking when that season comes.

We finally moved the last of our seedlings down to our teaching garden on Tuesday June 12. Here they are in their glory! Here are the sweet and hot peppers as well as our tomatoes.

We finally moved the last of our seedlings down to our teaching garden on Tuesday June 12. Here they are in their glory! Here are the sweet and hot peppers as well as our tomatoes.

Here is our vegetable garden to-date with hay and newspaper interspersed. The right side of this garden has been reserved for our peppers, which will go into the ground within the next week or so. The back portion is reserved for our tomatoes, which will also be joining the teaching garden soon!

Here is our vegetable garden to-date with hay and newspaper interspersed. The right side of this garden has been reserved for our peppers, which will go into the ground within the next week or so. The back portion is reserved for our tomatoes, which will also be joining the teaching garden soon!

Transplanting seedlings
Yesterday (5/8/2012) Sarah, Cara, Baker, Greyson, and I repotted the little tomato seedlings from seed starting in our egg cartons. We also repotted our sweet and hot peppers that have been growing since this little project started. They need a bit longer indoors and then we’ll start the process with hardening them off as well.

Transplanting seedlings

Yesterday (5/8/2012) Sarah, Cara, Baker, Greyson, and I repotted the little tomato seedlings from seed starting in our egg cartons. We also repotted our sweet and hot peppers that have been growing since this little project started. They need a bit longer indoors and then we’ll start the process with hardening them off as well.

The Governor’s Gardener

Our teaching garden had a big day at Life Adventure Center of the Bluegrass’s Open House on April 10th. A man stopped by the environmental education table I had set up. Our teaching garden pepper and squash seedlings were center stage for all to see. He asked me a little about environmental education and our teaching garden. As I explained our little operation, he happened to mention that he was the “Governor’s Gardener.” I had to ask him to repeat what he had said as I was in disbelief. He even asked how he could help!

The Governor’s Gardener (GG) has already donated 1,000 tulip bulbs to our organization, which were delivered on Friday (3/13). Turns out the GG had a great time at the open house learning about our organization and what we do. So needless to say our teaching garden had a great boost of support in the last few weeks!

If you’d like to learn more about the Governor’s Gardener and the program he helps oversee, please visit http://greenteam.ky.gov/garden.

The afternoon we planted

Yesterday afternoon Cara, Sarah, and I planted our little veggie seedlings in the teaching garden. We ended up with 10 rows of veggies altogether. Some we directly sowed and did not start from seeds. These tend to do better when direct sowed (ds).

 

From left to right we planted in rows

1)      carrots & radish (ds)

2)      mesculin, white chard, & arugula (all ds)

3)      kale & red chard (ds)

4)      cabbage

5)      broccoli

6)      cauliflower

7)      beets

8)      (sickly, sad looking) lettuce

9)      N/A

10)   Onions

11)   Cucumbers

Things we learned

·       Plant half as many seedlings of cabbage, broccoli, cauliflower, and cucumber. We had about half a flat of each of these leftover. We’re keeping some on reserve in case some of our seedlings don’t make it. Otherwise, we will be donating them to our staff garden near our kitchen on our property.

·        Trying to start onions from seed is extremely difficult. We had to scrap all of our “seedling onions.” The onions we planted are the ones that were rescued from our garden earlier this spring (which were planted last fall).

·        Egg cartons are great for starting seeds but you can’t keep them in the carton for very long. We lost of all our cute little squash plants because we didn’t bump them up to a bigger pot fast enough. We will be directly sowing the rest of our squash seedlings next week in hopes of having some squash plants (for Cara and Sarah to eat).

·        Starting lettuce from seed also did not seem to go very well. I couldn’t give up on them so I planted them in one of our open/unused rows. I also seem to have misplaced the other lettuce seeds  I thought we had so if these little guys don’t take, I will have to go buy some more.

Onions and peas

I’ve been slowly cleaning out the education building as most of our seedlings are outside now. I’ve taken all the rest of the seed starting materials including the leftover pro-mix and old flats down to the gardening shed as well. Only the peppers and squash are left inside.

I’ve also moved our new strawberry plants and the onions that were rescued from the garden, back down to the garden. They’re hanging out with the peas here in this picture. They’ll go in next week Tuesday with the rest of the plants.

Look at these peppers! I honestly wasn’t expecting anything to come of the peppers but then they came and surprised me.

Look at these peppers! I honestly wasn’t expecting anything to come of the peppers but then they came and surprised me.