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Here is our vegetable garden to-date with hay and newspaper interspersed. The right side of this garden has been reserved for our peppers, which will go into the ground within the next week or so. The back portion is reserved for our tomatoes, which will also be joining the teaching garden soon!

Here is our vegetable garden to-date with hay and newspaper interspersed. The right side of this garden has been reserved for our peppers, which will go into the ground within the next week or so. The back portion is reserved for our tomatoes, which will also be joining the teaching garden soon!

Our row of mesclun with our new newspaper/hay that Cara and Chelsey laid down on Wednesday.
Mesclun, (not spelled mesculin, which is how I always say it), is a mix of small, young salad leaves. The most common mix includes chervil, arugula, endive, and leaf lettuce. Some other mixes include spinach, arugula, chard, mustard greens, radicchio, sorrel, or others.
Mesclun actually has its origins in Provence, France (probably why I can’t pronounce it properly). It comes from the French word “mescla” which literally means “mixture”. For all of you Spanish speakers out there the word “mezcla” would be what you’re looking for.

Our row of mesclun with our new newspaper/hay that Cara and Chelsey laid down on Wednesday.

Mesclun, (not spelled mesculin, which is how I always say it), is a mix of small, young salad leaves. The most common mix includes chervil, arugula, endive, and leaf lettuce. Some other mixes include spinach, arugula, chard, mustard greens, radicchio, sorrel, or others.

Mesclun actually has its origins in Provence, France (probably why I can’t pronounce it properly). It comes from the French word “mescla” which literally means “mixture”. For all of you Spanish speakers out there the word “mezcla” would be what you’re looking for.

Upcycling/Mulching our Garden
Cara, our resident gardening expert, came up with the great idea to mulch our garden with newspaper and hay. These two things are found in abundance on our property. Our office receives a newspaper a week. Cara started a collection bin and soon enough we had enough to mulch. Our farm also produces its own hay. We checked around and found an extra couple of bales that were donated graciously to our gardening project.
Here is Cara and Chelsey (one of our new LACBG interns). They put down a layer of newspaper (mostly non-glossy) and then layered on the hay. “If you use glossy newspaper, you’re not considered organic” - Cara. Well we are shooting to be the closest to organic as possible, but our newspaper collection wasn’t as grand as we expected so we had to resort to some of the glossy stuff.
Using newspaper helps to keep the weeds down and also saves us the hassle of picking up black plastic liner for years after it has been tilled up. The newspaper and hay will also decompose much more quickly over time than typical mulch.

Upcycling/Mulching our Garden

Cara, our resident gardening expert, came up with the great idea to mulch our garden with newspaper and hay. These two things are found in abundance on our property. Our office receives a newspaper a week. Cara started a collection bin and soon enough we had enough to mulch. Our farm also produces its own hay. We checked around and found an extra couple of bales that were donated graciously to our gardening project.

Here is Cara and Chelsey (one of our new LACBG interns). They put down a layer of newspaper (mostly non-glossy) and then layered on the hay. “If you use glossy newspaper, you’re not considered organic” - Cara. Well we are shooting to be the closest to organic as possible, but our newspaper collection wasn’t as grand as we expected so we had to resort to some of the glossy stuff.

Using newspaper helps to keep the weeds down and also saves us the hassle of picking up black plastic liner for years after it has been tilled up. The newspaper and hay will also decompose much more quickly over time than typical mulch.