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Here is our vegetable garden to-date with hay and newspaper interspersed. The right side of this garden has been reserved for our peppers, which will go into the ground within the next week or so. The back portion is reserved for our tomatoes, which will also be joining the teaching garden soon!

Here is our vegetable garden to-date with hay and newspaper interspersed. The right side of this garden has been reserved for our peppers, which will go into the ground within the next week or so. The back portion is reserved for our tomatoes, which will also be joining the teaching garden soon!

Our row of mesclun with our new newspaper/hay that Cara and Chelsey laid down on Wednesday.
Mesclun, (not spelled mesculin, which is how I always say it), is a mix of small, young salad leaves. The most common mix includes chervil, arugula, endive, and leaf lettuce. Some other mixes include spinach, arugula, chard, mustard greens, radicchio, sorrel, or others.
Mesclun actually has its origins in Provence, France (probably why I can’t pronounce it properly). It comes from the French word “mescla” which literally means “mixture”. For all of you Spanish speakers out there the word “mezcla” would be what you’re looking for.

Our row of mesclun with our new newspaper/hay that Cara and Chelsey laid down on Wednesday.

Mesclun, (not spelled mesculin, which is how I always say it), is a mix of small, young salad leaves. The most common mix includes chervil, arugula, endive, and leaf lettuce. Some other mixes include spinach, arugula, chard, mustard greens, radicchio, sorrel, or others.

Mesclun actually has its origins in Provence, France (probably why I can’t pronounce it properly). It comes from the French word “mescla” which literally means “mixture”. For all of you Spanish speakers out there the word “mezcla” would be what you’re looking for.