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Check out the Woodford County Farmers Market if you live near Versailles, KY. Three great locations on three different days.
https://www.facebook.com/pages/Woodford-County-Farmers-Market/125838007428461

Check out the Woodford County Farmers Market if you live near Versailles, KY. Three great locations on three different days.

https://www.facebook.com/pages/Woodford-County-Farmers-Market/125838007428461

Julie Maruskin, Director of Clark County Public Library, discussed several of Kentucky’s native and naturalized tree species during the Edible Landscaping program on April 30th.
Edible families and individuals species in Kentucky include

ebonies (persimmon)


maples (sugar & black)


oaks (all species, including beech & chestnut)


walnuts (hickories & pecans)


laurels (sassafras)


mulberries (red & osage orange)


rose (crabapple, plums, cherries, serviceberries, hawthorn, berries)


honey locust


redbud


lindens (basswood)

Julie Maruskin, Director of Clark County Public Library, discussed several of Kentucky’s native and naturalized tree species during the Edible Landscaping program on April 30th.

Edible families and individuals species in Kentucky include

  • ebonies (persimmon)
  • maples (sugar & black)
  • oaks (all species, including beech & chestnut)
  • walnuts (hickories & pecans)
  • laurels (sassafras)
  • mulberries (red & osage orange)
  • rose (crabapple, plums, cherries, serviceberries, hawthorn, berries)
  • honey locust
  • redbud
  • lindens (basswood)

Edible Landscaping Workshop

The second of the two workshops I attended by Ms. Maruskin of the Clark County Library was Edible Landscaping. This workshop focused on landscaping with Kentucky’s native or naturalized perennial edible trees. Many use these trees for their tasty edible fruits or nuts. However, happens that many of these natives are also extremely beautiful and perfect for landscaping. Some of the trees discussed include pawpaw, persimmon, black oak, white oak, walnut, and hickory. Other trees known as “naturalized” to the area were also discussed. These trees are not necessarily native to Kentucky but have been introduced or cultivated but have now spread and multiply by natural regeneration.