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Final species from Edible Landscaping workshop!
Sassafras (Sassafras albidum)
Sassafras is an understory tree like the pawpaw. It prefers the company of larger species for partial shade. The leaves of the sassafras may be substituted for bay leaves in recipes since they are related. However, don’t eat the fruit! It’s fruit has a dark red peduncle is a deep, dark indigo-blue color.

Redbud (Cercis spp.)
Redbud is relatively short-lived (45 years or so). It’s flowers can be eaten. Vinegar can also be created from redbud. The pods can be eaten raw or lightly steamed like snow peas. Redbuds attract honeybees.

Mulberry (Morus spp.)
Both red and black mulberries are edible. They are one of the most common in Kentucky. Mulberry jam can also be created from its berries.

Lindens (Tilia spp.) 
Lindens are considered “good neighbor” species. Tea can be created from its flowers. The flowers are also very attractive to honeybees.

Final species from Edible Landscaping workshop!

Sassafras (Sassafras albidum)

Sassafras is an understory tree like the pawpaw. It prefers the company of larger species for partial shade. The leaves of the sassafras may be substituted for bay leaves in recipes since they are related. However, don’t eat the fruit! It’s fruit has a dark red peduncle is a deep, dark indigo-blue color.

Redbud (Cercis spp.)

Redbud is relatively short-lived (45 years or so). It’s flowers can be eaten. Vinegar can also be created from redbud. The pods can be eaten raw or lightly steamed like snow peas. Redbuds attract honeybees.

Mulberry (Morus spp.)

Both red and black mulberries are edible. They are one of the most common in Kentucky. Mulberry jam can also be created from its berries.

Lindens (Tilia spp.)

Lindens are considered “good neighbor” species. Tea can be created from its flowers. The flowers are also very attractive to honeybees.

After the great weeding last week conducted by new pathways, we’ve found quite a jungle of volunteer tomato plants. We’ve of course embraced these plants wholeheartedly. We’re quite excited to see this many come back from last season on their own.

After the great weeding last week conducted by new pathways, we’ve found quite a jungle of volunteer tomato plants. We’ve of course embraced these plants wholeheartedly. We’re quite excited to see this many come back from last season on their own.

Another great way to identify seedlings is with repurposed popsicle sticks. You can also use tongue depressors, which are a little wider and allow for a little more creative space. Here is a batch of seedlings from last year’s garden that was planted by Second Street in Frankfort, KY.
This is also a great excuse to eat lots and lots of popsicles. If anyone asks just tell them you’re creating seedling ID markers. You’re welcome.


Another great way to identify seedlings is with repurposed popsicle sticks. You can also use tongue depressors, which are a little wider and allow for a little more creative space. Here is a batch of seedlings from last year’s garden that was planted by Second Street in Frankfort, KY.

This is also a great excuse to eat lots and lots of popsicles. If anyone asks just tell them you’re creating seedling ID markers. You’re welcome.

Here is our teaching garden to-date. You can see near the right side of the photo the newly planted rows of sweet and spicy peppers. It’s a full veggie garden now!

Here is our teaching garden to-date. You can see near the right side of the photo the newly planted rows of sweet and spicy peppers. It’s a full veggie garden now!

Cara and I planted the peppers today. They’ve fit nicely into the two extra rows we created. They’ve also replaced the last of the beets that we’ve pulled from the garden.
We planted both the sweet peppers and the spicy peppers interspersed with one another. We thought it would add to the excitement of pepper picking when that season comes.

Cara and I planted the peppers today. They’ve fit nicely into the two extra rows we created. They’ve also replaced the last of the beets that we’ve pulled from the garden.

We planted both the sweet peppers and the spicy peppers interspersed with one another. We thought it would add to the excitement of pepper picking when that season comes.

We had a great group out on 6/13. Here they are with a couple of LACBG staff in the teaching garden completing a portion of their service project with us. Here they are weeding out the area that our tomatoes will be transplanted. They weeded the vegetable garden, herb garden, kentucky native garden, and turned all three compost piles. The amount of work they did saved us WEEKS and we are very grateful for their service.
During the great weeding, we also found about a dozen volunteer tomato plants already in the tomato area!

We had a great group out on 6/13. Here they are with a couple of LACBG staff in the teaching garden completing a portion of their service project with us. Here they are weeding out the area that our tomatoes will be transplanted. They weeded the vegetable garden, herb garden, kentucky native garden, and turned all three compost piles. The amount of work they did saved us WEEKS and we are very grateful for their service.

During the great weeding, we also found about a dozen volunteer tomato plants already in the tomato area!

We finally moved the last of our seedlings down to our teaching garden on Tuesday June 12. Here they are in their glory! Here are the sweet and hot peppers as well as our tomatoes.

We finally moved the last of our seedlings down to our teaching garden on Tuesday June 12. Here they are in their glory! Here are the sweet and hot peppers as well as our tomatoes.

St. John’s Reading Camp from Versailles visited us on Monday June 11. Due to isolated thunderstorms, we opted to move our gardening program indoors. The campers participated in several activities including seed, stretch, germination; discover the magic seed; and buzzy, buzzy bee. Here they are looking at different parts of a garden using viewfinders. Simple things like flowers, soil, rocks, twigs, etc… suddenly become very interesting when placed in these viewfinders. The campers favorite item was a bumblebee.


St. John’s Reading Camp from Versailles visited us on Monday June 11. Due to isolated thunderstorms, we opted to move our gardening program indoors. The campers participated in several activities including seed, stretch, germination; discover the magic seed; and buzzy, buzzy bee. Here they are looking at different parts of a garden using viewfinders. Simple things like flowers, soil, rocks, twigs, etc… suddenly become very interesting when placed in these viewfinders. The campers favorite item was a bumblebee.

Here is our vegetable garden to-date with hay and newspaper interspersed. The right side of this garden has been reserved for our peppers, which will go into the ground within the next week or so. The back portion is reserved for our tomatoes, which will also be joining the teaching garden soon!

Here is our vegetable garden to-date with hay and newspaper interspersed. The right side of this garden has been reserved for our peppers, which will go into the ground within the next week or so. The back portion is reserved for our tomatoes, which will also be joining the teaching garden soon!