Subscribe to gardening adventures by Email --> gardening adventures

 

Here is today’s harvest of tomatoes. They have become a favorite in the office. Great alternative to doughnuts, cupcakes, cakes, and everything else pastry that seems to infiltrate our office at extraordinary rates these days.

Here is today’s harvest of tomatoes. They have become a favorite in the office. Great alternative to doughnuts, cupcakes, cakes, and everything else pastry that seems to infiltrate our office at extraordinary rates these days.

Our volunteer tomato plants have become a “tomato bush”. They are producing a bountiful harvest as Cara is showing here. We’ve had to scrap all the cold weather crops (broccoli, cauliflower, cabbage). We just didn’t get them in the ground fast enough. Oh well… lesson learned!

Our volunteer tomato plants have become a “tomato bush”. They are producing a bountiful harvest as Cara is showing here. We’ve had to scrap all the cold weather crops (broccoli, cauliflower, cabbage). We just didn’t get them in the ground fast enough. Oh well… lesson learned!

… BENEFICIAL BUT LOCALLY HEAVY RAINFALL EXPECTED THROUGH THE WEEKEND…

Issued by The National Weather Service Louisville, KY for Woodford County (Versailles)

What to do with all that chard…
Cara really wanted some chard planted in our teaching garden so I obliged (obviously). Now, we have tons of white and red chard. Cara takes it home by the armful. However, this is even too much chard for Cara.
She ingeniously found a recipe that is perfect for this much chard… chard pesto. Instead of using precious basil to make her pesto, she uses armfuls of chard. It’s a really quick and easy recipe too!
Ingredients1 bunch (or armfuls) swiss chard, stems removed and coarsely chopped1 handful cilantro, coarsely chopped1 jalapeno, coarsely chopped2 cloves garlic1/4 cup pepitas, toasted1/2 cup olive oil1/2 lime, juicesalt and freshly pepper to taste
DirectionsPuree everything in a food processor.
Cara uses really small containers like baby food jars to freeze smaller portions of this pesto. This makes it really easy to pull them out on an as-needed basis.

What to do with all that chard…

Cara really wanted some chard planted in our teaching garden so I obliged (obviously). Now, we have tons of white and red chard. Cara takes it home by the armful. However, this is even too much chard for Cara.

She ingeniously found a recipe that is perfect for this much chard… chard pesto. Instead of using precious basil to make her pesto, she uses armfuls of chard. It’s a really quick and easy recipe too!

Ingredients
1 bunch (or armfuls) swiss chard, stems removed and coarsely chopped
1 handful cilantro, coarsely chopped
1 jalapeno, coarsely chopped
2 cloves garlic
1/4 cup pepitas, toasted
1/2 cup olive oil
1/2 lime, juice
salt and freshly pepper to taste

Directions
Puree everything in a food processor.

Cara uses really small containers like baby food jars to freeze smaller portions of this pesto. This makes it really easy to pull them out on an as-needed basis.

Today’s harvest included some interesting carrots (Danvers), baby tomatoes, and one small pepper that toppled over a pepper plant. Cara has renamed this variety of carrots “the voluptuous dancer” which seems much more defining than Danvers. Carrots with multiple taproots or forks like these occur for several reasons. Most likely they are associated with rocky or heavy soils. Digging and the addition of compost helps to alleviate this problem.

Today’s harvest included some interesting carrots (Danvers), baby tomatoes, and one small pepper that toppled over a pepper plant. Cara has renamed this variety of carrots “the voluptuous dancer” which seems much more defining than Danvers. Carrots with multiple taproots or forks like these occur for several reasons. Most likely they are associated with rocky or heavy soils. Digging and the addition of compost helps to alleviate this problem.

What to do with your beets!
Last year I had the pleasure of being a part of a local CSA. CSA stands for community supported agriculture or some say community shared agriculture. I was a little overexcited about this opportunity and opted for the full share. Needless to say, I had a ridiculous amount of food each week. My weeks soon consisted of blanching for hours. Anyway, back to my story.

One week I received beets in my share. Now beets were something I always avoided at all costs during thanksgiving. Nevertheless, receiving the food meant I needed to cook and eat it. So I got out my handy dandy vegetable cookbook to find a good recipe for these beets.

Now I can’t say this is the best recipe ever for beets. However, it’s my go to whenever I have beets now. It’s pretty simple too. Most people like their beets roasted. I’m most people. Now some roast the beets whole whereas others (me) roast them already diced. I usually roast them for about 45 minutes at 375. Once they are out of the oven and cooled down, you make the dressing. Mine since I’m pretty limited on ingredients ends up being minced garlic, S&P, horseradish, and Dijon mustard. You can, however, get real fancy and add white wine vinegar and chives.

To some this may sound like a gross combination but trust me, it’s incredible! The earthy flavor of the beets still comes through the dressing. This year in our teaching garden, we grew Guardsmark beets, which were exceptionally tasty, and I highly recommend.

Here’s an actual recipe, if you don’t want to follow mine…
http://www.food.com/recipe/baked-beets-with-mustard-horseradish-dressing-74134

What to do with your beets!

Last year I had the pleasure of being a part of a local CSA. CSA stands for community supported agriculture or some say community shared agriculture. I was a little overexcited about this opportunity and opted for the full share. Needless to say, I had a ridiculous amount of food each week. My weeks soon consisted of blanching for hours. Anyway, back to my story.

One week I received beets in my share. Now beets were something I always avoided at all costs during thanksgiving. Nevertheless, receiving the food meant I needed to cook and eat it. So I got out my handy dandy vegetable cookbook to find a good recipe for these beets.

Now I can’t say this is the best recipe ever for beets. However, it’s my go to whenever I have beets now. It’s pretty simple too. Most people like their beets roasted. I’m most people. Now some roast the beets whole whereas others (me) roast them already diced. I usually roast them for about 45 minutes at 375. Once they are out of the oven and cooled down, you make the dressing. Mine since I’m pretty limited on ingredients ends up being minced garlic, S&P, horseradish, and Dijon mustard. You can, however, get real fancy and add white wine vinegar and chives.

To some this may sound like a gross combination but trust me, it’s incredible! The earthy flavor of the beets still comes through the dressing. This year in our teaching garden, we grew Guardsmark beets, which were exceptionally tasty, and I highly recommend.

Here’s an actual recipe, if you don’t want to follow mine…

http://www.food.com/recipe/baked-beets-with-mustard-horseradish-dressing-74134

Hang on little veggie garden!


Hang on little veggie garden!

Check out the Woodford County Farmers Market if you live near Versailles, KY. Three great locations on three different days.
https://www.facebook.com/pages/Woodford-County-Farmers-Market/125838007428461

Check out the Woodford County Farmers Market if you live near Versailles, KY. Three great locations on three different days.

https://www.facebook.com/pages/Woodford-County-Farmers-Market/125838007428461

Cover crops explained
At the edible landscaping workshop, Ms. Maruskin also explained cover crops. Now, I have to admit I’ve never given this term much thought. I knew that farmers would often plant a crop during the fall to help cover during the winter and early summer but never stopped to wonder why. Cover crops are chosen because of their allelopathy. Rye, clover, sorghum, and vetch are a few that are commonly used. These plants produce chemicals that inhibit growth of other groups of plants. They truly help cover the tillable agricultural space as the seasons change. In addition to warding off potentially unwanted plant species, these cover crops also manage soil fertility/quality, water, pests, diseases, biodiversity, and wildlife.

Cover crops explained

At the edible landscaping workshop, Ms. Maruskin also explained cover crops. Now, I have to admit I’ve never given this term much thought. I knew that farmers would often plant a crop during the fall to help cover during the winter and early summer but never stopped to wonder why. Cover crops are chosen because of their allelopathy. Rye, clover, sorghum, and vetch are a few that are commonly used. These plants produce chemicals that inhibit growth of other groups of plants. They truly help cover the tillable agricultural space as the seasons change. In addition to warding off potentially unwanted plant species, these cover crops also manage soil fertility/quality, water, pests, diseases, biodiversity, and wildlife.